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Satellite Tracking

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Karen (XXC148) - Sea Grant

TAMUG Kemp's Ridley Tracking

A project of TAMUG Sea Turtle and Fisheries Ecology Research Lab.


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Karen (XXC148) is an adult female Kemp's ridley that nested on Bolivar Peninsula, Texas, 19 May 2010. Karen was outfitted with a Sirtrack KiwiSat 101 satellite transmitter by the TAMUG Sea Turtle & Fisheries Ecology Research Lab and released at Stewart Beach on Galveston Island the same day. Please note that there is a degree of error associated with satellite tracking, and tracks on land may either indicate a nesting attempt or be inaccurate.

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Species: Kemp's Ridley
Life Stage: Adult
Gender: Female
Release Date: 2010-05-20 00:56:00
Release Location: Galveston, TX
Last Location: 2012-02-07 14:32:08

Adoptive Parents:
Karen Nadeau
Oconomowoc Public Library
Abigail Ferguson
Jacob A
Abigail and Spencer Stones
Jesse Leftwich
Shanna Kethan
Karen Szauter
The De Leon Family

Background

The first sea turtle nest on the upper Texas coast in 2010 was laid on 19 May by Karen (XXC148), a Kemp’s ridley female discovered emerging from the Gulf of Mexico by Sea Turtle & Fisheries Ecology Research Lab (STFERL) Director Dr. Andre Landry. Karen deposited a clutch of 79 eggs on Bolivar Peninsula. Her eggs were excavated by biologists from Texas A&M University at Galveston and transported to Padre Island National Seashore for incubation and subsequent hatchling release. She was equipped with a Sirtrack KiwiSat 101 satellite transmitter and released at Stewart Beach on Galveston several hours after nesting.

Karen is a wild (non-headstarted) Kemp’s ridley as she lacks living and coded wire tags. The satellite tracking data gained from Karen and other Kemp’s ridley females tagged by the TAMUG STFERL are essential to characterizing sea turtle nesting on the upper Texas coast, as well as identifying inter-nesting and post-nesting movements of these critically endangered reptiles. Karen has been named in honor of Karen Stockton, a music teacher at Houston Community College, who passed away suddenly last year. Karen was a marvelous pianist, talented singer and conservationist. Her husband, Farrar Stockton, made a donation to STFERL for sea turtle public education signs in honor of Karen.

UPDATE JUNE 2010: Karen was observed by biologists from Texas A&M University at Galveston (TAMUG) laying another clutch of 100 eggs on Bolivar Peninsula, 2 June 2010. Her eggs were excavated and transported to Padre Island National Seashore for incubation and subsequent hatchling release. After nesting, Karen has exhibited a typical foraging migration toward Louisiana. There is growing concern Karen's movements may take her into the BP's Deep Horizon oil spill area.


SEATURTLE.ORG collaborates with Argos to help scientists and conservationists manage and analyse their valuable animal tracking data.

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